Tuesday, September 9, 2008

Chx Ballantine (Ballotine? Gallantine?)

As part of the "Eat Local" event this week I thought I'd break out the ole Ballantine. A deboned chicken that's stuffed, rolled and sliced. I picked up all the ingredients at local farms located between my house and the restaurant.

For ballantines 0r gallantines (Gallantines are served cold but the method is the same.)you have to debone the bird in a way that leaves it intact as possible. I roast the bones and make a chicken demi to serve with it. I had some fresh thyme in the garden so I infused the demi with that. The filling is made with ground chicken, organic eggs, local vegetables and seasoned with parsley and thyme from the garden. I posted a video of the process on youtube and it should be on my video bar. I'm a little out of practice so the video is a little long.

The way I prepared this dish is exactly how someone would make it in the country side of France today or two hundred years ago. It doesn't get much better. No nitrogen, no xanthan gum, no trapeze to present it on. Straight forward simple food made with fresh local ingredients. That is my definition of world class cuisine.

Call me old school, I don't mind.

(Editor's Note: I'm amazed how many people find this site by googleing "gallantine". For those of you who would like to see a video of de-boning the bird for a gallantine go to youtube saltydog55252)

8 comments:

Michael Walsh said...

nice looking ballantine! the video is cool too, that's one hell of a chicken cutting jam. who are we listening to there?

Scott Sebastian said...

Brian Setzer, 60 years on the planet.

Anonymous said...

Salty -
How do you cook it so that the meat on the outside doesnt dry out before the stuffing is fully cooked? Any hints for the home cook?

Scott Sebastian said...

Avoid over cooking. I pull it out a little early because the ballantine will continue to cook after it's out of the oven. The same goes for all meats and proteins. Place it in a warm spot and cover.

The steam generated from the filling will keep the outer layer moist. It's once the filling is dry that it will all to to hell.

Scott Sebastian said...

If that happens drown it in sauce or gravy.

Anonymous said...

Thanks for your brilliant picture and demonstration actually i made ballontine tonight and i was wondering what is real ballotine look like, tast like..
thanks...

Anonymous said...

Thanks for your brilliant picture and demonstration actually i made ballontine tonight and i was wondering what is real ballotine look like, tast like..
thanks...

Lanette said...

Hi, I came across your post searching for ideas on what to place inside of my Ballantine - I'm in culinary school. I noticed some concerns on drying out so I thought I would give some tips (I had perfect scores both times I've made this dish).

Brown all sides in a little bit of olive oil and then place in a 350 degree oven until it reaches 160 degrees (it will rise to 165 upon standing). : )